The Perceived Leadership Characteristics, Behaviors, and Self-Esteem: Conducting Your Nursing Leadership Orchestra As A Hispanic Nurse
By: Giselle Melendez
Published: 5/18/2016
Uploaded: 06/06/2018
Uploaded by: Pocket Masters
Pockets: 2016 (May) Teachers College Columbia University Ed.D. Dissertations, Gottesman Libraries Archive, Historical Dissertations
Tags: Hispanic, Leadership, Nursing, Self-esteem

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Description/Abstract: There is a great shortage of Hispanic nurses and nurse leaders in the United States. Hispanic nurses currently make up only 4.8% of RNs in the United States (Minority Nurse, 2014). As the population in the United States shifts from where Hispanics are the minorities and become the majorities, more Hispanic nurses will be needed to care for the patients (U.S. Census Bureau, 2014).
This descriptive study investigated the perceived leadership characteristics, behaviors, and self-esteem of Hispanic nurses. An online survey was conducted using the Leadership Practices Inventory (Kouzes & Posner, 2013), the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (Avolio & Bass, 2004), the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (Rosenberg, 1965), and a demographic questionnaire, through an advertisement on Facebook, and a flyer which, targeted individuals based on the specifications of this study's focus.
For the Leadership Practices Inventory (Kouzes & Posner, 2013) Hispanic nurses perceived the most widely displayed characteristic is Enabling Others to Act. On the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (Avolio & Bass, 2004) Hispanic nurses perceived the most widely displayed characteristic is that of a Transformational Leader and Satisfaction with Leadership. For the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (Rosenberg, 1965), Hispanic nurses had normal to high self-esteem. There were significant positive correlations (p < .01) indicating that Hispanic nurses perceive leaders to be transformational leaders.
Hispanic nurses across the United States (N = 193) participated in this study. The majority of the participants indicated that their current job title was a staff nurse (n = 82) and their highest level of education is a Bachelors degree or higher (n = 172). Results indicated that only 32.1% (n = 62) have held a leadership position in a professional nursing organization.
The findings of this study offer a promising future for Hispanic nurses in the United States. Based on these findings, greater consideration should be placed on developing Hispanic nurses to become leaders in the healthcare profession. By developing Hispanic nurses into leaders, they will continue to build upon their skills but they will be a mentor to others and one day provide the opportunity to conduct their nursing leadership orchestra.