The Connections Between Four-Quadrant Brain Theory and Executive Coach Development
By: Tiffany Markesha Dotson
Published: 5/20/2015
Uploaded: 03/12/2018
Uploaded by: Pocket Masters
Pockets: 2015 (May) Teachers College Columbia University Ed.D. Dissertations, Gottesman Libraries Archive, Historical Dissertations
Tags: Coaching, Executive Coaching, four-quadrant brain theory, learning from experience, thinking styles, whole brain thinking

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Description/Abstract: The purpose of this qualitative case study was to gain insight as to whether/how coach’s perception of four-quadrant brain theory influences the way they apply a subset of coaching competencies and draw on learning from experience in their work with clients. Participants included 12 executive coaches from the Global Coaching Program. Data collection methods were interviews and video observations. One assessment was examined; Neethling Brain Instrument. Three research questions were explored:

RQ1. Whether/how the perception of thinking style preference (as defined by four-quadrant brain theory) influences a sample of executive coaches application of a subset of coaching competencies in their work with clients (i.e., questioning, listening, relating and presence)?

RQ2. How do executive coaches apply coaching competencies with baseline awareness of their thinking style preference and coaching competencies; and after formal knowledge of thinking style preferences, coaching competencies and practice?

RQ3. In what ways do executive coaches draw on learning from experience (either intentionally or intuitively) in their work with clients?

The researcher found:

• The combination of a coach’s thinking and learning style could influence the way he/she listens. A coach’s thinking style influences their ability to listen to collect data and listen to body language and nonverbal clues.

• The combination of a coach’s thinking and learning style could influence the way he/she asks questions. A coach’s thinking style influences their ability to ask questions that go beneath the surface and tailor questions.

• Thinking style influences coaches’ ability to establish presence by connecting to clients and through discovery. More techniques are required to help coaches establish presence.

• Thinking style influences coaches’ ability to relate to clients through empathy and trust. More techniques are required to help coaches relate to clients.

• General pattern of amplification of coaching competencies from baseline to oral exam (time 1 and time 2).

• Coaches draw on learning from experience intentionally from past experiences, reflecting on their experience and through failures. Coaches draw on their learning from experience intuitively through intuitive learning, using their own approach and unconscious learning.