Young Men Who Have Sex with Men in the Eras of Online Social Networking and Hiv/Aids: An Online Investigation Into Factors Related to Engagement in Risk And Protective Behavior
By: Erik Santacruz
Published: 2014
Uploaded: 01/11/2018
Uploaded by: Pocket Masters
Pockets: 2014 (May) Teachers College Columbia University Ed.D. Dissertations, Gottesman Libraries Archive, Historical Dissertations
Tags: HIV/AIDS, Protective Behavior, risk, Sex Behavior, social networking

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Description/Abstract: The study addressed the risk young men who have sex with men (YMSM) face as users of online social media. The sample (N = 160) was mostly White (51.9%, n = 83) and Latino (40.0%, n = 64) with a mean age of 31.24 years (min 18, max 63, SD = 8.95).
For the outcome variable being in an action or maintenance stage for using harm-reduction or self-protection strategies while online; backward stepwise regression revealed the best predictor of higher stage of change for using social networking technology (B = .569, p = .000)--accounting for 31.9% of variance (R2 = .324, AdjR2 = .319). For the outcome variable being in an action or maintenance stage for using condoms with any sex partner and/or any other sex partner, backward stepwise regression revealed predictors of: not being in a relationship (B = -.265, p = .001), higher self-efficacy for condom negotiation (B = .235, p = .002), high social norms level for peers using condoms (B = .243, p = .002), having a partner who has sex with others (B = .207, p = .013), and being non-White (B = -.162, p = .040)--accounting for 24.4% of variance (R2 = .272, AdjR2 = .244). For outcome variable being in an action or maintenance stage for coping and responding to racism and/or oppression, backward stepwise regression revealed predictors of: a higher score on ability to cope and respond to racism and/or oppression (B = .414, p = .000), HIV negative status (B = -.244, p = .001), born in the U.S. (B = .235, p = .001), higher score for greater perception of racism and/or oppression (B = .222, p = .003), less frequent use of substances during sex (B = -.161, p = .030), having sex with someone other than a main or steady partner (B = .151, p = .037), and higher stage of change for accessing E-Health (B = .152, p = .040)--accounting for 34.6% of variance (R2 = .378, AdjR2 = .346).
Qualitative data revealed engagement in harm reduction for personal safety as a recurrent theme.