Stereotypes of HBCU Collegiate Choir Members Towards Concert Spiritual
By: DaVaughn Miller
Published: 05/16/2012
Uploaded: 11/20/2017
Uploaded by: Pocket Masters
Pockets: 2012 (May) Teachers College Columbia University Ed.D. Dissertations, Gottesman Libraries Archive, Historical Dissertations
Tags: gospel music, historically black college, musical preference, musical stereotyping, social identity theory, Spirituals, university

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Description/Abstract: The concert spiritual performance practice, as sung on Historically Black Colleges and University (HBCU) campuses, is steadily declining in today's society. With the rise of gospel music today and its saturation within the African American church, it may be that students attending HBCUs may have diminished appreciation for the genre do to a lack of exposure. Consequently, gospel music fans participating in HBCU Concert/University choirs may possess stereotypes projected upon concert spirituals and its fans. Indirectly, these stereotypes may be contributing to the decline of the concert spiritual performance practice.

The purpose of this study was to examine the stereotypes gospel music fans participating in HBCU Concert/University choirs project upon the personalities, personal qualities, and values of concert spiritual fans. The study was comprised of two surveys. Survey 1 was designed to examine the content of concert spiritual stereotyped profile, while Survey 2 was designed to assess the accuracy of the identified stereotypes. Participants consisted of choir members from seven HBCUs spanning across North Carolina and Virginia, who were also members of the Intercollegiate Music Association. Two hundred and six choir members (83.4%) of a possible 247 choir members participated in this study. Each survey was comprised of three separate test scales: Five-Item Personality Inventory (FIPI), Self-Attributes Questionnaire (SAQ) and Rokeach Values Survey (RVS).

Results from this study indicated that HBCU choir members who identified themselves as gospel music fans stereotyped concert spiritual fans as being religious; and to have valued salvation, wisdom, love, self-respect, family security, courage, inner harmony, forgiveness, and intellect. Of the top 10 stereotypes projected upon concert spiritual fans, eight stereotypes were shared by concert spiritual fan's self-ratings (i.e., salvation, wisdom, love, self-respect, family security, courage, inner harmony, and forgiveness), thus suggesting some "hint" of accuracy.

HBCU choir directors must remain aware that gospel music fans within their choirs positively stereotype concert spiritual fans, and are relatively accurate. Although gospel music fans do stereotype concert spiritual fans, HBCU Choir directors can go forward realizing that these stereotypes are not responsible for the decline of the concert spiritual performance practice in today's society.